Sunday, February 17, 2019

Review: Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made

Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made by Eugene D. Genovese
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I just loved it as a Christian and as a History freak.

Based on extensive exploration of oral History and other records from slaves, slaveholders and observers of slavery in the US, what began as an exploration of how slaves influenced the world of slaveholders ended up, as the title hints, as a record of the witness that preachers but specially slave converts gave of their faith and its power to change people and societies.

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Sunday, January 20, 2019

Review: The Logic of Congressional Action

The Logic of Congressional Action The Logic of Congressional Action by R. Douglas Arnold
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

An interesting take in the motivations and mechanisms of legislative work, scientifically dismantling a few myths about how constituencies, either general or particularist, influence legislators’ actions.

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Saturday, January 12, 2019

Review: HAIPOJI 5

HAIPOJI 5 HAIPOJI 5 by Takashi Kira
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A great read. Why only four ſtars?

* Explicit ſex. Totally uneeded. Lack of ability of ðe auþor to imply ðe dirtineß of ðe protagoniſt’s life wiþout actually ſhowiŋ it.

* Quite confuſiŋ towards ðe end. It depicts a multiverſe where ðe protagoniſt gets mixed between þree or four univerſes, but unleß one’s familiar already wiþ ðe concept, & ſpecially in a ſerialiſed work, it can be uneceßarily taxiŋ to read.

* It is highly unſatiſfyiŋ ðat ðe protagoniſt’s wife turns irretrievably againſt him for no apparent reaſon, even if he ſeems a genuinely faiþful & nice huſband — juſt not a hero, but growiŋ even in his fourties & fifties.

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Friday, January 11, 2019

Review: 3月のライオン 14 [3-gatsu no Lion 14]

3月のライオン 14 [3-gatsu no Lion 14] 3月のライオン 14 [3-gatsu no Lion 14] by Chica Umino
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A lyrical, quite ſane ſlice of life ſtory wiþ ſurpriſiŋ depþ. Not diet-friendly.

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Friday, January 4, 2019

Review: Haruka 17, Volume 19

Haruka 17, Volume 19 Haruka 17, Volume 19 by Sayaka Yamazaki
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A very intereſtiŋ in-depþ view of the Japaneſe popular entertainement induſtry. The ending was ruſhed & roſy.

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Monday, December 31, 2018

Review: Solomon Among the Postmoderns

Solomon Among the Postmoderns Solomon Among the Postmoderns by Peter J. Leithart
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Takes a while to ſtart, wiþ a long & ſympaþetic expoſition of what is (& is not) poſtmoderniſm), & only comes to its own in ðe laſt few pages, when it fully brings Solomon’s wiſdom to bear witneß unto poſtmoderns; yet more ðan worþ its while.

On a ſecond readiŋ, for tranſlation, looſes a bit of it ſtrengþ due to me haviŋ already read Carſon’s duo ‘Chriſt & culture reviſited’ & ‘Ðe intolerance of tolerance’, which ſeriouſly deflates Poſtmoderniſm.

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Thursday, December 20, 2018

Review: Mysticisme d’hier & d’aujourd’hui

Mysticisme d’hier & d’aujourd’hui Mysticisme d’hier & d’aujourd’hui by Jean-Marc Berthoud
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Toujours un plaiſir lire Jean-Marc Berþoud, ici en tant que partenaire d’écrite avec ſon épouſe Rose-Marie. Le ſujet n’eſt pas facile ni agréable, pourtant c’eſt indiſpenſable pour l’église d’hui.

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Review: L'ordre du discours. Leçon inaugurale au Collège de France prononcée le 2 décembre 1970

L'ordre du discours. Leçon inaugurale au Collège de France prononcée le 2 décembre 1970 L'ordre du discours. Leçon inaugurale au Collège de France prononcée le 2 décembre 1970 by Michel Foucault
My rating: 0 of 5 stars

Je devra relire — trop obſcure pour moi, & je n’ai pas eu le loiſir toutes les références.

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Review: The Intolerance of Tolerance

The Intolerance of Tolerance The Intolerance of Tolerance by D.A. Carson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Ðere is ſomeþiŋ about Carſon’s writiŋ ſtyle ðat irks me — perhaps he is a little itſy bitſy too didactical, wiþ quite a few references to former or furðer parts of the ſame books, perhaps a lack of confidence in his articulation of ideas ðat makes he explain a bit too much.

But ðere is no complainiŋ about his ideas nor about his competence to defend ðem. His command of French enables him to ſee what oðer anglophone writers do not — for inſtance, he handly deflates KA Smiþ and oðers’ infatuation wiþ Postmoderniſm, even makiŋ criticiſm of it ſuch as ðe Wilſons’ ſeem like kickiŋ dead dogs, as we ſay in Brazil.

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